How is trigger finger treated in Singapore?

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Doctor’s Answer (1)

"Offering a finer touch in hand and reconstructive microsurgery"

There are 3 ways to treat trigger fingers:

  1. Splinting, hand occupational therapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications. These aim to relieve the inflammation around the involved tendon, mobilise and prevent adhesions from forming between the tendons.
  2. Corticosteroid injections. These are very effective and quick in relieving the pain and inflammation around the tendons that cause the triggering of the finger. Trigger finger can recur after treatments 1 and 2.
  3. Surgery. The aim of surgery is to eliminate the obstruction of the normal gliding of the tendon, which is swollen due to inflammation. Commonly, the proximal-most annular pulley is divided to achieve this. The surgery is done through a small incision on the palm of the hand and this will give a longlasting solution to trigger fingers. Trigger fingers rarely recur after surgery.

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